Domestic Animals in the Viking Age. Migration, trade, environmental adaptation and the potential of multidisciplinary studies

DAVA

Alkamispäivä

01.01.2016

Päättymispäivä

31.12.2017

Tiivistelmä

Primary objective:
The primary objective of the DAVA workshops is to establish a strong interdisciplinary research network where researchers from archaeology, zooarchaeology, ancient DNA and modern genetics work to integrate their approach to researching domestic mammals in the Viking Age, and to utilise this network to apply for collaborative, large European or Nordic research grant with the participants from the workshops.

Secondary objectives:
Facilitate research to increase our understanding of migration, trade and environmental adaptation during the Viking Age, a time period of innovation and profound changes in the societies of Northern-Europe.

Provide an opportunity for early career scientists, including PhD students and postdocs, to develop interdisciplinary research networks.

Encourage specialists from different fields to explore where research interests merge, and learn how to use data from other research fields.

Writing of a review article about current knowledge about domestic animals in the Viking Age to be published in a leading peer-reviewed journal in open access.

Publication of workshop proceedings in open access online.

The preparation of guidelines for sample selection for ancient DNA analysis of archaeological material published in open access online.

To hold open public lectures where leading scientists from the workshops present their work.

Tavoitteet, vaikuttavuus ja hyödyt

The DAVA project was a workshop-project. The primary objective of the DAVA workshops was to establish a interdisciplinary research network where researchers from archaeology, zooarchaeology, ancient DNA studies and modern genetics work to integrate their approach to researching domestic mammals in the Viking Age.

During the DAVA project, multidisciplinary networking among the researchers from Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, UK and France was established. Researchers from zooarchaeology, osteology, historical archaeology, history, linguistics, molecular and population genetics, domestic animal studies, animal genomics, bioinformatics, isotope analysis and lipid analysis learn to know easch others research projects and results. Transfer of knowledge was important.